Bibliography: Democracy (page 004 of 596)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the I'm with Tulsi website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Sabine Manzel, Greg Tanaka, Caryn McTighe Musil, Rongbin Han, Juliet Perumal, Heidi Biseth, Sarah M. Stitzlein, Bosse Bergstedt, Sabahattin Ciftci, and Jarrod S. Hanson.

van der Ploeg, Piet (2016). Dewey versus "Dewey" on Democracy and Education, Education, Citizenship and Social Justice. In the literature on citizenship education, frequent references are made to Dewey. However, educationalists do not always interpret him correctly. To provide some counterbalance, I explain Dewey's views on education and democracy. I base this, not only on "Democracy and Education", but also on 17 articles that Dewey wrote after "Democracy and Education", and on his "Ethics" and two earlier works, frequently cited by educationalists: "Ethical Principles Underlying Education" and "School and Society". According to Dewey, democracy and education are two sides of the same coin. Both involve and foster self-determination, self-development and participating in the common good, enlightened by intelligent understanding and scientific spirit. At the present, it is customary to define democratic citizenship education primarily in terms of social and moral learning, sometimes as though it can be distinguished from academic learning, as something extra besides learning subject matter. When such an approach is attributed to Dewey, as it often is, this is unwarranted.   [More]  Descriptors: Democracy, Citizenship Education, Democratic Values, Educational Philosophy

Johansson, Lotta; Bergstedt, Bosse (2015). Visions Unite through the Concept of Democracy: The School and the Popular Adult Education, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. With a point of departure in the concept of democracy, this article aims to show how Swedish Popular Adult Education influenced the content of the established school system in Sweden. The Popular Adult Education and established school systems are studied through their relation to democracy, based on curricula, as well as on visionary and political steering documents. In accordance with conceptual history, the study shows how Popular Adult Education and the established school, with their different spaces of experience and references to separate traditions, gradually became accommodated through a common horizon of expectations about the importance of democracy. When this coalescence appeared, an administrative shift could be identified and the Popular Adult Education Movement was partially disarmed.   [More]  Descriptors: Popular Education, Adult Education, Democracy, Foreign Countries

Wang, Gang; Wu, Liyun; Han, Rongbin (2015). College Education and Attitudes toward Democracy in China: An Empirical Study, Asia Pacific Education Review. The modernization theory contends that there is a link between education and democracy. Yet few empirical studies have been done to investigate the role of higher education on promoting democratic values in the Chinese context. Using China General Social Survey 2006, this paper generates several findings which are not completely consistent with the existing theoretical explanations on political development. Specifically, the college-educated Chinese citizens not only agree that there is need to improve democracy, but support various types of political participation and resist the government-oriented petitioning. However, though entrepreneurial elites (private business owners) and political elites (Chinese communist party members) demonstrate preference to democracy in principle, empirical evidence suggests that they are much less likely to support political participation that challenges the authoritarian regime in China compared to knowledge-based elites (college-educated adults).   [More]  Descriptors: Democracy, Political Attitudes, Authoritarianism, Foreign Countries

Biseth, Heidi (2009). Multilingualism and Education for Democracy, International Review of Education. This essay attempts to show the importance of linguistic issues in education for democracy and the close relationship between democracy and multilingualism. Increasingly nation-states are having to adapt to linguistic diversity within their borders and to recognize that democracy requires the participation of all citizens, including those belonging to linguistic minorities. Democracy also requires that all linguistic groups share a sense of community. The author argues the need for educational policies that address these challenges.   [More]  Descriptors: Democracy, Multilingualism, Cultural Pluralism, Educational Policy

Ciftci, Sabahattin (2013). The Relationships between Students' Attitudes towards Social Studies and Their Perceptions of Democracy, Educational Research and Reviews. Social studies is one of the foundation subjects that takes place in curricula of 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th grades. This subject aims to train good citizens. The concept of democracy is an essential topic for the students to comprehend so as to achieve this aim through this subject. Therefore, it is aimed, in this study, to determine the relationship between students' attitudes towards social studies subject and their perception of democracy concept. A total of 665 primary 7th grade students participated in the study, 333 of whom were girls and 332 were boys. It was found that there was a positive relationship between the students' attitudes towards social studies subject and their perception of democracy. In addition, there was no significant difference between students' attitudes towards social studies subject and their perceptions of democracy concept in terms of their genders.   [More]  Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Student Attitudes, Social Studies, Democracy

Musil, Caryn McTighe (2015). "A Step Away from Complacent Knowing": Reinvigorating Democracy through the Humanities, Arts and Humanities in Higher Education: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice. "A step away from complacent knowing" argues that the humanities have long been understood as enhancing civic life and human intellectual and moral development. At moments when democratic societies seem at risk, however, such as the birth of the new US Republic, the aftermath of World War II, and in the face of an anemic twenty-first-century American democracy, the humanities have been deployed with special urgency to cultivate democratic values and practices. The 2012 report, "A Crucible Moment: College Learning and Democracy's Future," underscores how central the humanities are in such a stratified, diverse, and globally linked world. The report both cited and launched a vibrant creativity within the academy. Civically enriched, student-centered humanities designs illuminate a path for reinvigorating democracy while also rejuvenating the humanities themselves.   [More]  Descriptors: Democracy, Humanities, Higher Education, Educational History

Ku, Hsiao-Yuh (2016). Fighting for Social Democracy: R.H. Tawney and Educational Reconstruction in the Second World War, Paedagogica Historica: International Journal of the History of Education. R.H. Tawney (1880-1962), a leading English economic historian and prominent socialist, was vigorously involved in educational reconstruction during the Second World War. For Tawney, the war was a war for social democracy. His ideals of social democracy formed a basis for his case for Public (independent) School reform and free secondary education for all. Despite this, the connection between Tawney's ideals and his perspectives on educational issues has not been addressed fully by historians and thus there has been a lack of a proper explanation for his often criticised sympathy for the public schools and his indifference towards the multilateral school. Hence, this paper aims to re-examine the link between them in greater depth. It concludes that, according to Tawney's ideals of social democracy, the abolition of the public schools was not necessary for the establishment of a democratic educational system. Moreover, Tawney did not launch an attack on the tripartite system proposed by the Norwood Report of 1943 since it was not against his ideal of equality as long as different secondary schools were equal in quality and status. Equality, he believed, must be advanced through the raising of the school leaving age to 16 and the abolition of fees in all secondary schools. Thus, he laid more emphasis on the school leaving age and tuition fees than on the multilateral school. In brief, on various issues pertaining to secondary education, Tawney's opinions and actions were deeply grounded in his distinctive ideals of social democracy.   [More]  Descriptors: Democracy, War, Educational History, Educational Change

Ciftci, Sabahattin (2013). The Relationships between Students' Attitudes towards Social Studies and Their Perceptions of Democracy, Educational Research and Reviews. Social studies is one of the foundation subjects that takes place in curricula of 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th grades. This subject aims to train good citizens. The concept of democracy is an essential topic for the students to comprehend so as to achieve this aim through this subject. Therefore, it is aimed, in this study, to determine the relationship between students' attitudes towards social studies subject and their perception of democracy concept. A total of 665 primary 7th grade students participated in the study, 333 of whom were girls and 332 were boys. It was found that there was a positive relationship between the students' attitudes towards social studies subject and their perception of democracy. In addition, there was no significant difference between students' attitudes towards social studies subject and their perceptions of democracy concept in terms of their genders.   [More]  Descriptors: Student Attitudes, Social Studies, Democracy, Citizenship Education

Davis, Margaret H. (2010). Practicing Democracy in the NCLB Elementary Classroom, Online Submission. The practice of teaching democracy in school is diminishing. The implementation of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) has forced teachers to teach to the test, and has required some to follow scripted curriculum, leaving little time or incentive for teaching democracy. This study examines the importance of practicing democracy and identifies ways in which it can be done in the NCLB classroom. The literature demonstrates the importance of teaching democracy through practice in schools. Ideas on how to accomplish this in the pre-NCLB classroom are well documented. By surveying public school teachers, this paper endeavors to bring awareness to its importance and to provide ways in which the NCLB classroom teacher can practice democracy. Results indicated that teachers are interested in practicing democracy and believe it is important. The survey and interviews found specific areas of concern and ways for teachers to bring democracy into the NCLB classroom. Two appendixes are included: (1) Survey; and (2) Interview Questions.   [More]  Descriptors: Federal Legislation, Democracy, Public School Teachers, Classroom Environment

Perumal, Juliet (2016). Enacting Critical Pedagogy in an Emerging South African Democracy: Narratives of Pleasure and Pain, Education and Urban Society. "Education Before Liberation" became the mantra of the struggle against apartheid oppression in South Africa. Apartheid policies predestined the Black majority to servitude and dehumanization. The advent of democracy heralded a plethora of transformative curriculum policies with the express intent to counter the destiny that the Apartheid regime had envisioned for the Black majority. The current curriculum canon which is premised on the tenets of critical pedagogy espouses the ideals of social justice and democracy, and embodies the intent to educate for liberation and social transformation. This article addresses the central question: How do the material tensions of enacting critical pedagogical tenets manifest in post-apartheid South African education through the narratives of educators as transformative intellectuals? In responding to this enquiry, in this article I will (a) sketch an analysis of teachers' identities as enshrined in retrospective and current curriculum policies; and (b) draw on data from a qualitative study conducted at schools in Johannesburg, South Africa, to explore educators' personal and professional narratives of pleasure and pain as they persevere in being transformative intellectuals within disadvantaged school communities in an emerging democracy. This article argues that if the ideals of democracy is central to the curriculum for students, then the education system needs to ensure that the personal and professional wellbeing of teachers should form an integral part of the human rights discourse.   [More]  Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Critical Theory, Democracy, Teacher Characteristics

Carr, Paul R., Ed.; Zyngier, David, Ed.; Pruyn, Marc, Ed. (2012). Can Educators Make a Difference? Experimenting with, and Experiencing, Democracy in Education. Critical Constructions: Studies on Education and Society, IAP – Information Age Publishing, Inc.. As the title of this book suggests, how one understands, perceives and experiences democracy may have a significant effect on how he/she actually engages in, and with, democracy. Within the educational context, this is a key concern, and forms the basis of the research presented in this volume within a critical, comparative analysis. The Global Doing Democracy Research Project (GDDRP), which currently has some 70 scholars in over 20 countries examining how educators do democracy, provides the framework in which diverse scholars explore a host of concerns related to democracy and democratic education, including the impact of neoliberalism, political literacy, critical engagement, teaching and learning for and about democracy, social justice, and the meaning of power/power relations within the educational context. Ultimately, the contributors of this book collectively ask: can there be democracy without a critically engaged education, and, importantly, what role do educators play in this context and process? Why many educators in diverse contexts believe that they are unable, dissuaded and/or prevented from doing thick democratic education is problematized in this book but the authors also seek to illustrate that, despite the challenges, barriers and concerns about doing democracy in education, something can, and should, be done to develop, cultivate and ingratiate schools and society with more meaningful democratic practices and processes. This book breaks new ground by using a similar empirical methodology within a number of international contexts to gage the democratic sentiments and actions of educators, which raises a host of questions about epistemology, teacher education, policy development, pedagogy, institutional cultures, conscientization, and the potential for transformational change in education. This books contains the following: (1) Introducing the Global Doing Democracy Research Project: Seeking to Understand the Perspectives, Experiences and Perceptions of Teachers in Relation to Democracy in Education (David Zyngier and Paul R. Carr); (2) Democracy, Critical Pedagogy and the Education of Educators (Paul R.Carr); (3) Re-Discovering Democracy: Putting Action (Back) into Active Citizenship and Praxis (Back) into Practice (David Zyngier); (4) Can We Teach Deep Democracy: And Can It Make a Difference? (Carolyn M. Shields); (5) Getting Beyond Flat-Out Bored: The Challenges and Possibilities of Creating a Democratic Space for Social Justice Education in Publically Funded Schools (Michael O'Sullivan); (6) Preservice Teachers' Conceptions of Democratic Essence: Interpretations of Democratic Principles, and Their Connections to Social Justice, Economic Class, and Spirituality/Religion in the United States (Thomas A. Lucey); (7) What Kind of Citizenship for What Kind of Democracy? Are We Spectators of Everyday Events or Protagonists in History? (Adriana Murriello, Andrea Ledwith, and Cecilia Naddeo); (8) Teacher Education and Democracy: Preparing Teachers in Metropolitan Buenos Aires (Maria Delia Traverso); (9) Education for Democracy in Peruvian Society (Felix Reategui and Susana Frisancho); (10) Doing Democracy in Education: Perspectives of Malaysian Principals (Sazali Yusoff); and (11) "Critical Multicultural Social Studies" for "Deep Democracy": Theory and Practice (Marc Pruyn). "Reflections on the Global Doing Democracy Research Project," a foreword by Schugurensky, is included.   [More]  Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Social Justice, Preservice Teacher Education, Educational Change

Stitzlein, Sarah M. (2011). Democratic Education in an Era of Town Hall Protests, Theory and Research in Education. One central aspect of a healthy democracy is the practice of democratic dissent. For the first time in many years, dissent is being widely practiced in town hall meetings and on street corners across the United States. Despite this presence, dissent is often suppressed or omitted in the prescribed, tested, hidden, and external curriculum of US schools. This article calls for a realignment of these aspects of curriculum with both a guiding vision of ideal democracy and a realistic interpretation of democracy as it is currently invoked in order to maximize this historic moment and work toward more robust democracy as a whole. This article will define dissent, show why it matters for healthy democracy, describe its role in the conscious social reproduction of citizens, reveal implications of the current more consensus-oriented forms of democracy portrayed in US schools, and call for new work on consensus and dissent in schools given changes in the present environment.   [More]  Descriptors: Democracy, Civics, Dissent, Role

Hanson, Jarrod S. (2013). In Defense of a Deliberative Democratic Civics Education, ProQuest LLC. Political divides in our democracy are ever-widening. Deliberative democratic civics education provides a new way for civics education to prepare students for a democracy that addresses the diversity in moral perspectives that have created the divides in a more constructive way. Civics education traditionally has been tied to aggregative theories of democracy. My dissertation defends grounding civics education in deliberative democracy. This type of civics education requires bringing moral controversy to the center of the civics classroom, and I defend that practice against its critics. I also examine controversies in deliberative democratic political theory from the perspective of civics education, and outline what a deliberative democratic civics education would look like in the classroom. Grounding civics education in deliberative democracy provides students not only with the means to participate in democracy as citizens, but to influence the shape of that democracy going forward. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.%5D   [More]  Descriptors: Civics, Citizenship Education, Democracy, Moral Issues

Manzel, Sabine (2016). Competence for Democracy: Participation and Decision-Making in Classroom Interaction, Citizenship, Social and Economics Education. In this keynote address given at the International Association for Citizenship, Social and Economics Education (IACSEE) Conference in July 2015, Sabine Manzel focused on participation and decision-making as key competences for democracy. She analysed with standardized videography how both of these competences are realized in classroom interaction.   [More]  Descriptors: Participative Decision Making, Classroom Communication, Student Participation, Conference Papers

Tanaka, Greg (2015). On Collapse and the Next U.S. Democracy: Elements of Applied Systemic Research, Anthropology & Education Quarterly. While concern has been growing in recent years about the structural precursors to economic collapse in the United States, and a parallel decline in democracy, few have asked: (1) what moral and cultural foundations might be necessary as building blocks to launch a democratic renewal and (2) whether a different and "deep" democracy might be constructed this time that accords everyday citizens the agency they will need to initiate policy at the national level. The article introduces a research methodology to frame and assess change at this macro, or systemic, register and examines the role that education can play in teaching citizens how to exercise agency in a reconstituted democracy that is more nearly "by, for, and of the people."   [More]  Descriptors: Democracy, Research Methodology, Role of Education, Citizen Participation

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