Bibliography: Democracy (page 013 of 596)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the I'm with Tulsi website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Stefano Oliverio, Michael Glassman, Min Ju Kang, Jing Lin, Maura Striano, Wendy Yanow, Robert V. Bullough, Scott L. Pratt, Joni Schwartz, and Vanessa Scholes.

Yanow, Wendy (2010). "Blues Is Easy to Play but Hard to Feel" (Jimi Hendrix), New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education. In the United States there is such incredible complacency about both the meaning of democracy and America's position as the great democratic nation that there is very little, if any, public debate on what is meant by democracy and what responsibilities Americans bear as a democratic nation. In response to the editors' growing recognition of the limits of the collective understanding of the substance of democracy, the focus of this text has included an exploration of the meaning of democracy and a drawing of the connection between democratic practice and adult education. At its core, one might conclude that the practice of democracy is the practice of adult education. That the process requires inclusive and thoughtful participation suggests a need for critical engagement. And critical engagement enacted through discussion suggests the presentation of multiple perspectives and supported arguments, the results of which often reflect a depth of understanding that can emerge from critical analysis of lived experience. In this chapter, the author reflects on some of the insights gained by the editors over these past months as they discussed the struggle for democracy and shared governance in the many spaces they refer to as adult education.   [More]  Descriptors: Democracy, Adult Education, Governance, Criticism

Moyle, Kathryn (2014). Technologies, Democracy and Digital Citizenship: Examining Australian Policy Intersections and the Implications for School Leadership, Education Sciences. There are intersections that can occur between the respective peak Australian school education policy agendas. These policies include the use of technologies in classrooms to improve teaching and learning as promoted through the "Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians" and the "Australian Curriculum"; and the implementation of professional standards as outlined in the "Australian Professional Standard for Principals" and the "Australian Professional Standards for Teachers". These policies create expectations of school leaders to bring about change in classrooms and across their schools, often described as bringing about "quality teaching" and "school improvement". These policies indicate that Australian children should develop "democratic values", and that school principals should exercise "democratic values" in their schools. The national approaches to the implementation of these policies however, is largely silent on promoting learning that fosters democracy through education, or about making connections between teaching and learning with technologies, school leadership and living in a democracy. Yet the policies promote these connections and alignments. Furthermore, understanding democratic values, knowing what is a democracy, and being able to use technologies in democratic ways, has to be learned and practiced. Through the lens of the use of technologies to build digital citizenship and to achieve democratic processes and outcomes in schools, these policy complexities are examined in order to consider some of the implications for school leadership.   [More]  Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Educational Policy, Technology Uses in Education, Democracy

Glassman, Michael; Kang, Min Ju (2011). Five Classrooms: Different Forms of "Democracies" and Their Relationship to Cultural Pluralism(s), Educational Philosophy and Theory. This paper explores the issue of democracy and the role of the democratic classroom in the development of society in general, and the way in which educators understand and deal with diversity in particular. The first part of the paper explores different meanings of democracy and how they can be manifested in the classroom. We argue that the idea of a "democratic classroom" is far too broad a category; democracy is defined in action and can have realist or pragmatic characteristics, elitist or pluralist roots. The realist form of social education was championed by political scientist Charles Merriam, while a social educative process more dependent on pragmatic problem solving was pursued by educational philosopher John Dewey and those who followed in his theoretical wake. The history of democracy in the United States, and the battles of how to import different meanings of democracy into the classroom over the course of the 20th century is explored, suggesting that the educational establishment has a tendency to adopt more realist/elitist forms of civic education. We present five "democratic" classrooms with different characteristics to illustrate the different characteristics social education can exhibit. In the second part of the paper we discuss the relationship between different types of democratic classrooms and issues of race/ethnicity/culture.   [More]  Descriptors: Democracy, Cultural Pluralism, Role of Education, Pragmatics

Carr, Paul R.; Pluim, Gary; Thésée, Gina (2014). The Role of Education for Democracy in Linking Social Justice to the "Built" Environment: The Case of Post-Earthquake Haiti, Policy Futures in Education. The manner in which the built environment is constructed has a tremendous effect on the degree to which health, wealth and social outcomes are distributed within a society. This is particularly evident when a crisis of the natural environment affects the built environment, as was the case after the Haitian earthquake of 2010. Understanding the consequences of the earthquake as socially precipitated rather than a natural occurrence requires a paradigm shift, a project for educational policy, pedagogy and epistemology. In particular, education for democracy in its broadest sense can serve to re-align thinking towards understanding the connection between the built environment and social justice. In this article the authors present their research with teacher-education candidates and the candidates' perspectives and experiences of education for democracy at a Canadian university. In relating these perspectives to the possibilities for contextualizing the aftermath of the earthquake in Haiti, the authors propose educational policy solutions that highlight a thick democracy, social justice, the role of context and history, and a more concrete connection with public health.   [More]  Descriptors: Role of Education, Democracy, Social Justice, Natural Disasters

Stoddard, Jeremy (2014). The Need for Media Education in Democratic Education, Democracy & Education. Despite the potential for media and technology to act as a democratizing force and the challenges to democracy posed by partisanship and the explosion of political media spending, media education and the preparation of active citizens in schools is virtually nonexistent. This essay presents the case for revitalizing media education for the age of digital media as a tenet of democratic education and outlines an agenda for teacher education, curriculum integration, student engagement, and research.   [More]  Descriptors: Citizenship Education, Democratic Values, Media Literacy, Educational Needs

Pratt, Scott L. (2016). Geography, History, and the Aims of Education: The Possibility of Multiculturalism in "Democracy and Education", Educational Theory. In this essay, Scott Pratt develops the tension at work in "Democracy and Education" between conceptions of multiculturalism that emerge from Dewey's commitment to progress as a process of civilization and from his contrasting commitment to a vision of progress as a localized process that requires respect for boundaries and limits. The first is related to what Patrick Wolfe has called "settler colonialism." The second conception of multiculturalism, framed by the aims of education and the conception of growth, avoids the problems of the first and provides a foundation for a practical, decolonial multiculturalism in the context of twenty-first-century education.   [More]  Descriptors: Democracy, Democratic Values, Cultural Pluralism, Social Change

Jorgensen, Sara; Schwartz, Joni (2012). Continuing the Legacy: Democracy and Education Practice, Journal of Research and Practice for Adult Literacy, Secondary, and Basic Education. The American adult education and literacy movement in the early twentieth century had its roots deep in the study and practice of democracy (Ramdeholl, Giordani, Heaney, Yanow, 2010). From Lindeman, Dewey, Laubach, Horton, to Heaney and Brookfield, a persistent theme is the indispensable relationship between democracy and adult education. For Heaney and Brookfield, this theme is often a lament on how democratic praxis has been marginalized among adult educators and programs in recent years (Heaney, 1992; Brookfield, 2005b). This relationship is not solely an American phenomenon. Early adult educators in this country were influenced by international movements such as the Folk School Movement in Denmark and its founder N.F.S. Grundtvig (Stewart, 1987), the Antigonish Movement in Nova Scotia and Dr. Moses Coady (Alexander, 1997), Study Circles in Sweden (Rubenson, 2006), as well as the work of Paulo Freire in Brazil (1973). The two projects discussed in this article fall squarely within this rich legacy of the teaching and practice of democracy; the State House Project (SHP) of the Haitian Multi-Service Center (HMSC) in Boston, a division of Catholic Charities, is a program-wide initiative in democratic learning both inside and outside the classroom. The second project is a classroom-based approach called Circular Response Discussion (CRD), which is designed to generate discussion around students' understanding of democracy both in American and international contexts and utilized at the City University of New York (CUNY).   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, Adult Educators, Teaching Methods, Democracy

Bullough, Robert V., Jr. (2009). Thoughts on Teacher Education and Democracy, Teacher Education and Practice. Studying democracy, and doing so critically, while striving to live it presents a peculiar and special charge to public education. As John Goodlad suggested, for teacher educators and in-service educators, this charge brings with it a responsibility to stand as stewards of public education and, hence, the most noble traditions of democracy in America, traditions that are fragile and in need of constant nurturing. Realizing this charge has far-reaching implications and may ultimately be the single, perhaps only, means for preserving public education in America. To this end, democracy needs to become a central part of the explicit curriculum for both public and teacher education.   [More]  Descriptors: Democracy, Teacher Educators, Public Education, Teacher Education Curriculum

Striano, Maura (2016). The Travels of "Democracy and Education": A Cross-Cultural Reception History, Educational Theory. After its publication in 1916, "Democracy and Education" opened up a global debate about educational thought that is still ongoing. Various translations of Dewey's work, appearing at different times, have aided in introducing his ideas within different conversations and across different cultures. The introduction of Dewey's masterwork through academic, institutional, or political avenues has influenced its reception within contemporary educational scenarios; these avenues need to be taken into account when analyzing the book's reception as well as its impact on the reconstruction of educational discourse.   [More]  Descriptors: Democracy, Democratic Values, Educational Theories, Educational Change

Jorgensen, Sara; Schwartz, Joni (2012). Continuing the Legacy: Democracy and Education Practice, Journal of Research and Practice for Adult Literacy, Secondary, and Basic Education. The American adult education and literacy movement in the early twentieth century had its roots deep in the study and practice of democracy (Ramdeholl, Giordani, Heaney, Yanow, 2010). From Lindeman, Dewey, Laubach, Horton, to Heaney and Brookfield, a persistent theme is the indispensable relationship between democracy and adult education. For Heaney and Brookfield, this theme is often a lament on how democratic praxis has been marginalized among adult educators and programs in recent years (Heaney, 1992; Brookfield, 2005b). This relationship is not solely an American phenomenon. Early adult educators in this country were influenced by international movements such as the Folk School Movement in Denmark and its founder N.F.S. Grundtvig (Stewart, 1987), the Antigonish Movement in Nova Scotia and Dr. Moses Coady (Alexander, 1997), Study Circles in Sweden (Rubenson, 2006), as well as the work of Paulo Freire in Brazil (1973). The two projects discussed in this article fall squarely within this rich legacy of the teaching and practice of democracy; the State House Project (SHP) of the Haitian Multi-Service Center (HMSC) in Boston, a division of Catholic Charities, is a program-wide initiative in democratic learning both inside and outside the classroom. The second project is a classroom-based approach called Circular Response Discussion (CRD), which is designed to generate discussion around students' understanding of democracy both in American and international contexts and utilized at the City University of New York (CUNY).   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, Adult Educators, Teaching Methods, Foreign Countries

Scholes, Vanessa (2014). Must a Developed Democratic State Fully Resource Any Tertiary Education for Its Citizens?, Educational Philosophy and Theory. This article takes a parsimonious conception of a developed State operating under a minimalist conception of democracy and asks whether such a State must fully resource any tertiary (post-compulsory) education for its citizens A key public policy barrier to arguing an absolute obligation for the State to resource any tertiary education is considered; namely, the fact of scarce resources creating competing obligations for the State. This article argues even a minimalist conception of democracy requires that States fully resource some tertiary (post-compulsory) education, regardless of whether directing resources away from other public needs results in the non-prevention of some avoidable suffering and death. A policy recommendation for resourcing this education is considered, and an alternative policy proposed.   [More]  Descriptors: Democracy, Educational Policy, Barriers, Educational Finance

Levine, Peter (2014). A Defense of Higher Education and Its Civic Mission, Journal of General Education. The liberal arts and the civic mission of higher education are under attack in this time of economic crisis and political polarization. But we can proudly and forthrightly make the case for the civic mission of higher education. The purpose of the liberal arts is to prepare people for responsible citizenship, and the best forms of civic engagement are intellectually challenging; they are the liberal arts in action. Research shows that civic education at the college level makes people into better workers. And engaged universities address many serious public problems, including unemployment, that matter to citizens and policy makers. This article was originally delivered as a speech at the 2013 American Democracy Project and Democracy Commitment Meeting in Denver, June 7, 2013.   [More]  Descriptors: Higher Education, Institutional Mission, Citizenship Responsibility, Citizen Participation

Oliverio, Stefano (2014). The Democratic Public to Be Brought into Existence and Education as Secularization, Education and Culture. The paper tackles the fundamental question of whether democracy has by now been turned into a meaningless liturgy of a past religion and proposes a Deweyan answer which points to the need to fully realize modernity in order to bring into existence a genuine democracy. By deploying an archaeological reading of "The Public and Its Problems" and, in particular, of the key notion of the "official," it is shown how giving birth to an authentically democratic public demands coming to terms with a re-signification of the idea of transubstantiation, fully valorising education as communication and promoting a "secularized" community. This Deweyan perspective can help us avoid the modern dichotomies that risk haunting even some of the most advanced contemporary educational proposals, which currently struggle against the rationalist outcomes of modernity by invoking "other communities."   [More]  Descriptors: Democracy, Social Theories, Role of Education, Educational Theories

Lin, Jing (2016). What Is Education For? A Discussion of Nussbaum's "Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities", Education and Urban Society. This article provides a discussion of the book, "Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities" by Martha C. Nussbaum from the perspective of a visiting scholar to the United States from China. It begins by addressing two critical topics discussed by Nussbaum: consequences of focusing only on economic growth and the importance of humanistic values. The article then incorporates the voices of other scholars as it considers implications of Nussbaum's work. The article concludes by suggesting service-learning as a means of accomplishing the educational goals proposed by Nussbaum.   [More]  Descriptors: Democracy, Humanities, Economic Development, Humanistic Education

Avis, James (2014). Austerity and Modernisation, One Nation Labour–Localism, the Economy and Vocational Education and Training in England, Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies. The paper addresses national and global questions concerned with neoliberalism, social democracy and social justice. It explores a number of themes that arise from the British Labour Party's policy review and its rebranding as One Nation Labour (ONL). In particular it addresses ONL's approach to the economy, localism and vocational education and training in England by drawing a comparison with the policies of the Coalition government and New Labour. It argues that the policies of ONL are by no means new with many of these found in New Labour and the Coalition. It is suggested that the aspirations of ONL to refashion social democracy for austere times is compromised by the inherent capitalist nature of the economy. This poses the question as to how far the interest in social justice can be furthered in such circumstances.   [More]  Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Vocational Education, Neoliberalism, Democracy

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